CL Logo Small.png

Career lions

You don’t have to do anything

You don’t have to do anything

Coming home since my three-week holiday break hasn’t been as relaxing and refreshing as I would have expected it to be. I mean, dealing with uncertainty has always been a little hard for someone with anxious tendencies like me, but with stuff going on at work and with my health, anxiety might just have reached its peak. Therefore, Lianne Keemink’s (Dutch) book Je Moet (bijna) Niks (which translates into: You have to do (almost) nothing), came as a blessing. In her book, Keemink, also known from the self-help hipster blog, gives her insights and lessons she learned from the world of self-help books in a nice and down to earth manner. As she gave some good reminders for us A-type personalities, I thought I would share my two favourite ones with you.

You are allowed to think negatively

Oh boy, all the self-help books emphasize the fact that we need to approach life in a positive manner and apply positive thinking all over. While I agree, this is an approach that suits me most of the time, I also think one needs to taste the rainbow of emotions. In other words, it’s impossible (and we would be lying to ourselves) to only think positively. For this reason, it was such a refreshing thought when Keemink explained that it’s absolutely not bad to be thinking negatively every now and then. Giving the negative thoughts a little space will even allow you to get over them more quickly. So, if you don’t feel like smiling all the time: just pout and know it’s actually good for you.

We are the ones being hard on ourselves

We need to have a great career, participate in extracurricular activities, maintain a fit body, have an active social life, be the best girlfriend/daughter/sister. All while practising mindfulness. These are all things important to us and what we enjoyed putting time into, but where along the way did everything become mandatory? It didn’t! It’s the pressure we put on ourselves that makes it all mandatory. The chapter Keemink dedicates to thing phenomenon has got me thinking into why I am this hard on myself, only to realize that it’s okay to take a step back every once in a while, to take a breather.

The verdict? Keemink’s book has been refreshing to read among the countless amount of self-help books that are focused on getting the best productivity and positive thinking. While that’s still one of my great interests, it was nice to read something about slowing the pace a bit (I’ve actually been cheerleading and recommending this book nonstop to my female friends for the past week). What about you? Do you have any (anti) self-help book recommendations we need to read?

The Art of the Good Life Review for #Careerlions

The Art of the Good Life Review for #Careerlions

Update: The Ultimate Planning Tool For a Career Lion

Update: The Ultimate Planning Tool For a Career Lion